Impact Goal Rush
Impact Goal Rush

Episode 7 · 1 year ago

Paul Dunn of B1G1 - Just imagine that we reach the goals

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Paul Dunn share why all entrepreneurs need to be focused on impact and aligning our businesses to the SDGs.

An Lo and welcome back to the impact Gorash podcast, I'm your host wont in so we've Got Paul done of B, N G N and it's a platform that is responsible for for over twoundr. Two hundred and twenty three million giving impacts is a he's, a true inspiration so and in this episode, poushares of the history of the devlepment of the golds itself and his very insectual perspective of why entrepreneurs are Tha Force for good end and why entrepreneurs are the ones thegs going to be creating the changes that we are going to see in the future. So I hope you enjoy this episode as much as I did recording it with Paul Welcome to the showpall. So this is the impact goal rush and it's all about inspiring impact entrepreneurs to be more aligned with the global goals, and you are the CO founder and chairman of bngn. So could you tell us why is it important for entrepreneurs to be impact driven and more line with the Goble Gols Wel? I gavme his two quessions one. Why should we, you know be impact drifen. The BONC by should be linked out to the gods. So let's talk about impact, the reality is- and I think through Covid we've seen this massive shift, and one of the shifts that we found is that thi shift between value and values, values and are really really important. And then, when you IU know, there's what you stand for. Another way of saying that is is that to have a purpose, that is to say something bigger than yourself some sort of North Star. If you will, is really really important and when you have that that's something bigger than yourself, seven Sevhan, caby Coran in you know the seven habits he calgled it, the North Star and Mon, in something bigger than yourself. Then you become like a magnet, a magnut for customers, a magnet for talent, so that it's easier to get people on your team, a magnet for investors. So it's really important to understand that purpose: powers, profirt, that's really important and another way of thinking about that is that impact big there. Let me say that another woy yeah impact that's right, that impact powers income so, in other words the greater the incom, the Gon Tof, the impact that you're making in the world righ. Then the greater the income, which also them means the greater the profit man. So but then again you don't do it because that's your motive! Your motive should not be the money. Your motive should be the purpose or the impact Youre correct. Now, once you start talking about impact, then the good news is that there is a global, I hesitate to say standard, but there is a a global gol. In fact, they called the global gods right. There's? U Sainable Development Goas, which were introduced on the twenty third of September, two thousand and fifteen in Geneva, and the reason they came in because some of US may remember: We had the millennial goals right around them when Youre only year, two thousand, and then there was this gap where the world wasn't. You know, didn't, have anything to kind of focus on so a whole bunch ar very clever entrepreneurs. You know, and I an some of you, some of them- you would know their names. You know like like, for example, POR polmarand. You would know Bill Gates, O Rihard brandson or of these guys wbut they did. They got their teams working on the global gop three years. It took them and they basically said what have we got to do to make this the kind of place that we would want to leave to our grandchildren and that's when they came up with the seventeen gorls and underneath those seventeen gors one hundred and sixty nine targets. So you have things like you know: no poverty, life, life, yellow water and all of that kind of stuff and the seventeen...

...goys ar really really important. What you discover is that they are all interrelated, so you know one cannot exist without the other, and so this te tends to become like a global standard. Now and so within B. One G one which you mentioned before we are everything, is pinned to the global goals and we track your performance towards the Gobal God, and people now are, as well as having revenue goals, which, of course, is interesting or profit goals, they're. Also having given gods, that is theire saying you know this year. We want to make a hundred thousand impacts or whatever those impacts are that they wish to make an all of those when they're, in B on gone, will be tracked alongside our progress towards the global gods. So that's a long answer to a sort, a short question, but I I hope it gives you enough detail for it so pol. I love that you Shae that the names the big names like Paul Polman and Sir Richard Brenson have been involved when they at the start of this development, but my understanding was that there's also been a bit of crowd saucing of these goals. That happened, and I thought that was quite fascinating- that they managed to get people to vote on some of these problems, but at the start of the sdgs yeah exactly well. The most interesting thing about that interesting enough was, you know a lot of people refer to them as the UN global gods. I don't do that. I refer to them as the global gods. The reason I do that is because when most people, I think, sadly, when they hear the word UN by they go. Oh Yeah, you know group of F and nothing happens. You know they just kind of talk about things right, but what was really interesting about the announcement on the twenty Thiro Sectember, tw, Thousa and fifteen, was that the the then president of nobody called the the deput. The Secondary General of the United Nations stood up, and it's the first time that the UN has ever said this and what they said was that Bhis that they said that we don't require all the countries to sign off on this. Why? Because countries governments exactly the word they use. Governments do not change our world. Now. That's an astonishing thing for a world body to say right now. Certainly we all know t at that that governments can impact. You know can ilieve all those things, but the next sentence ou of his mouth was this. So it's businesses that actually change our world. So what e's talking about is? Yes, I MHAN. It's really nice that you know a hundred and ninety three countries signed off on these Global Gorls, but what's more important? Is that because the actual change happens when businesses entrepreneurs really embrace the global God and the UN when it announced them, was you know for two of US always for sight, ful and saying you know it's businesses that change ha lot. So that's why an and be one gym one! You know we refer to be on o one business for good, and so when people kind of lock on to the lovely things that we're doing in B, Ong one, they can correctly say that they become not just a business for good, but I force for good and it's that being if we go back to the first thing that you asked me where I talked about, you know becoming a magnat right, thits kind of interesting, because when we think of magnetic we think of force right. So, what's really interesting is you can sort o go full circle and say: Oh when I'm embracing the goals, then what I'm actually, what I actually am doing as an entrepreneur is being a force for...

...good and isn't that something better than saying? Oh, I'm trying to you know just put money in e in my back pocket right. That's that no one is Attractiv by that, but everyone is attracted by this greater goal that you have exactly so, and this is really fascinating right I mean, I think, one of the podcast that Ir hurt you recently you wil on Kathleens Cathen, Har, Muwtons podcast, Oh yeah, Thayou, TAK, aboutse inewi knew cathe when she was likeiteen or something s eyeah. It's such a good episode. I think everyone should listen to it. So one of the things you mentioned was the the effect of Gilving and and could you share a bit about the deat, because I think that you got a very unique view on Dhat yeah. The one of the things that is really interesting is to observe just take a look at ourselves right and ask ourselves wher. Are we at our best when are we at o best righ and if you, if you've seriouly as that question or you look around when is so and slow at their best rigy? Well, every single one of us, I think, is actually FA. It's almost like it's in Ourof DNA right and it's this we're all every single one of us is at our best when we're giving and- and by that I don't mean necessarily that we're you know sheling out money to some charities. I don't necessarily mean that what I mean is you know when here in Singapore, as you know, there's no need to have a car right, so you know when I get on the bus. The first thing I do as I flash my card, you know to pay for the trip. First thing I do is I look at the driver of the Bass. I Bourhda wiboal and I say thank you for stopping now frenks any freaks the drivers that, but you know it's and- and I would imagine that you know at the end of the day or their long day- they gons Uldn', guess what happened. You know a guy outside stoppe. Seventy two stopped and said: Thank you, you Tomme, but it's the same thing with with with you know, retantion drivers or how did the mean just ask this question? How do you feel people listening to us now? How do you feel when you help someone across the road? How do you feel now I'll tell you how they feel they feel fantastic right? They feer R, fantastic t, and so we think that when we're giving we're giving to them right, but actually it's us that feels fantastic as well. Rightso, there's a beautiful thing about giving you know when when you I was hearing someone the other day saying you know if you have, as as probably during Covid, if you Tus have had those moments when you go, what is this all about? You know we have the you know, sort of depressive kind of episode. Sometimes you know the question is: How do you get out of it? Werl you don't get out of it. By going, I got to think positive. I got to think positive. I gott there's not what you do right, because there's like how they oh can I do that right now, but what you can do is do some action that involves some gratitude for something and just that simple act. Is You being at your best at that moment in time and it starts to change everything for you. I love that. I think there's so true that when you give you actually the one that jis benefiting, I think thats eais really rit. It is e. We often think you know. We think that it is the beneficiaries and the beer I mean it is of Courseis a beneficious right. I had someone the other day in the United Kingdom, who had made a resolution that she would join B, Ong one on the first of December, which he did and she would do her first giving and she wrote she put a on Crosh Tup mean I said I had a gol to do this it and she said, Oh, my gosh. It felt so good. I think tha, I think the FHRAST seuse was it felt so warm and fuzzy. You know it felt so good right and that's it, and- and that's...

...that's one of the reasons why, in ind on jm one, for example, you know E, we don't talk about Wewe, don't we when we show pictures of what's happening, we don't show you pictures of emancipated children and all that kind of stuff that you know make you feel guilty. This is not about people feeling guilty. This is about people sharing the joy of giving and fortunately right so to go back wight to the start. That means that when we give we make impacts when we make those impacts D now we've got a standard that we must achieve. I we have to ageve this thing by two thousand and thirty rigt on We'e got ten years ten years to make it all happen, and because of Covid we've got room, you know, we've got, we've got a speed up. We really have, unfortunately, and that's one of the reasons why you r your podcast here about impact, is so important because we've just got to get the message out that there you know there are some some important things for us to do and I think one of the things that covid has shown us. You know you just look at it. Look in the United Kingdom, where you are right now going back a few months everybody's talking about that one hundred year old, Captain Tom, you know, and Captain Tom Walked a hundred whatever avoen it wasn't very far, but all of a sudden he raises a hundred and twenty six million pounds or something, and so we look at them. We go wow. Isn't that great right and and then I think, Captain Tom was nightit or something as a result of thet right so and we look at that, and even when we look at it, we were not even part of it, but we look at it and we go that's great that it's great so whatif. We were all doing something like that. Not Not necessarily, you know, walking around the garden, for you know Imewhat Tis, ar setting ourselve challenge, but just caring enough really caring enough to do something not for ourselves but for others, and I think that one of the things that we continue to see through through Covid is that is the acceleration of that understanding. You know you could not have been on this planet for the last nine months or, however long hits been and not understand that we're all connected in ways that we that we never even imagine before righ and it took you know something like this to really bring that home to us, and so one of the things that we're seeing right now is is literally it's very. It surprises a lot of people, but we are seeing record number of people record numbers of people joining us in there. One go we're seeing record levels of giving the like of which we've never seen before, and that just illustrates to me that there is this. There is without wanting to minimize any of the dreadful things that have occurred through the prandemic. That there is this there is this other side to it. You know, and that's that's really important, and that can you know one of the great things about this is we have, as I said before, we have these targets, which enable us to do things, and you know what I'm assissing. You mentioned Paul Pallman a while ago, Purfoman who was the the Co Vuna Lever, and you know right widely regarded as the most sustainable business leader on the planet. He now runs a company interesting me and I've called imaginedcom and this wonderful speech that he does wer where he he talks about that you and I and the people listening to us. I suspect we have one what he refers to as the birth lottery. We won an SAI. We one of the two percent. Listen to that number were one of the two percent of people: WHO'VE WAN it to go hey on what on earth? Is he talking about two percent in the birth lottery? What he's...

...talking about is that when you and I were born most of us lassing when we were born, you know we had. We were born in a hospital, we had doctors around us, we had food, we have water, we had. You know we had all those things that sustained us in that point, and the amazing truth is that there are ninety eight percent of kids in the world who don't have them it. It's amazing number and we just don't realize that, and so with the advent of the goals which are pointing out these things, you know no poverty, you know all of those kind of things and then other things like you know, climates know, we look at the climat. We look at all of those sorts of things across those seventeen goals. You know, and by the way, just just on that. I don't think I mentioned this to Catherine Solen me mention it to you. You've KINDF got an idea of how old I am ID so the other day I was listening to watching a Netflix thing, and then we tell you how the program began and then I'll tell you what the name of the program was. The program began. T ene was a guy in the program Agan, I'm ninety three years old. Now because of my age, when I see someone ONTV WHO's. Ninety three years o ago, okay, you got me, I'm EA at was actually who it was by the way was Sidavid Evevar and th yeah and the the O anybody listening. Now I mean yes, we should keep listening to wons podcast, but when we have the time, let's go, listen to it's only fifty of minutes long and it's called a life on our planet. The ending of that program is the most amazing ending that I have ever seen on anything that talks about the kind of thing that you and I are talking about right now. You know, and what I mean by that is that frequently when we feel passionate about something right, we kind of become like if you will actabists and we sort of in people's faces and all that kind of stuff, and what we don't understand is that when we're in people's faces, whitely or wrongly riht some people a lot of people, a gin ob repelled by that- and yet what you want them to do is to tun to you not be repow. So question is: How do you do it? The answer to that is: Go watchthem, go watch that day, Tha Eberthin, because there's so many quote: Unquote, terrible things going on with climate right that you listen to that and at the end of it, th I'll tell you what the last three words are and then you don't need to go watch it tot figure out what he's talking Abouto. So the last three words on it. I mean. Let me let me give it another context. You and I've been talking about some extraordinary things. Right. We've been talking about impact about the responsibility of entrepreneurs. Yes, it is a responsibility to feel you know to fess up and really get something bigger than ourselves to understand that it is entrepreneurs who change our world it to quote the United Nations for one right and then we think that all to the gods. So what happens in the in this last part of the prine? So imagine just imagine for the minute that we did all of those things. Just imagine that those seventeen things you know from no proverty o life below war and life on earth, to partner ships, to lea you know to decency and responsibility, legal systems that work all of those things. You can look them up, tho, seventeen things right and so imagine if we actually did all of that by t o thousand and thirty and then the last three words of that life on a life on our planet. So for you this just imagine that I love that. Just imagine that Rit's a beautiful way to think bout, the power of what we...

...know- yeah wow. I need to watch it because so many people have mentioned it to me. Vupisegive me a big surprise that the program begins in the most unlikely place. It begins Inchanoble, it begins Oh yeah and then you know thirs beautiful production, as you would expect with Sirdavid, and then you see him as a boy walking down this English lane and then, when it gets to the closing piece that piece. I just told you about. There's there is real life now walking down what looks like the same English lane that he was walking down when he was a boy. The difference is that that lame is in Cinobal, that's the difference, and it's like Ohno I may. Maybe that was a s I should have given you a spoiler alert for that one, but but anyway, it' worth watching. It really is awesome. Po, so for for people who wants to you know turn their business to be more impact driven. How can they use be and Juan? Oh, that's that's a great question. You know. I think that B, One j one is history making because it's the first time that anything you know the all sort of thing is our you know: Xizaig Company probadly supports. You know ABC charity and they're. Nothing wrong with them mean that's a good thing, but think about it. How much better is it to be able to say every time I send an email could get saccess to education every time I join a zoom link, eleven kids get access to like check life, saving water, you know and you so, in other words, t you can embar these activities and just make it happen as it were automatically and you've got this wide choice you can give from one cent. One cent makes a difference so as entrepreneurs, you know we used to Montremeneurs, saying things like well, when I'm successful, I gotayou go byhing on a second. What is it that you don't understand about the journey? I Thi? This is the journey right. This is you beg at your best at every step of the journey. Hence the reason that giving and we're seying. Fortunately, I think were saying so many entrepreneurs. You know you included getting into that and really really living it each and every day, and so you know and changing our our world and tiny tiny ways, but collectively massive ways and doing that every second every day and in every way. So that's what B Yng want allows you to do. Yeah, I loved, I mean it's such a game changer in terms of giving and how how it can be done so differently, and I mean I've I've sort of registered my business right when I started my business I noiso so yeah for people who are listening. How can you know how can people get in touch with you? Oh well, all sorts of ways, but probably the simplece is you know you can drop me in email, I'm very happy to hear from you. Normally, you know I' e, give you linkedin INM Pacebogn. You know all those sorts of things, the simplest ways: droppinn EMA, Paul, B, Ng Oncom, it's Pul at B, as in Elter, be the number one and then the onlete g and the number onecom, and you can of course go to be on goncom on its home. Without the POL Intronodat and have a look at all of the magical things that we've been we've been sharing with you today as well awesome. Thank you very much Paul. It's been such a great conversation here. Well, thank you. It's it's been really great to hang out with you,...

...particularly at this really important time, and so for all of our listeners. To thank you for taking time to to listen, and probably some of you will be heading up to Christmas- make sure it's a great one and let's make sure that two thousand and twenty one is a year, that's full of entrepreneur ship at the Max and giving it the Max as well asome. Thank you. Thank you. So please do let us know what has been your biggest takeaway from this episode and, if Youd like to support the podcast, please do livers and reading and review on Epper podcast, because this would help us get this podcast to wider audience. For the next episode, we're going to have Yo atwards of brannew consultancy in the distruptors club, where she's going to be sharing her experience, working with many many impact, ontropeners helping them identify their identity. This is impact, go rush and I'll see you in the next episode.

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